The Blog

A plan: something is always better than nothing

Posted by Tom LarsenDec 31, 2013 Operations, Organization, Planning 0 Comment

Start the New Year with freshness – A Plan

Plan: Noun

1. A scheme, program, or method worked out beforehand for the accomplishment of an objective

2. A proposed or tentative project or course of action

3. A systematic arrangement of elements or important parts; a configuration or outline

Plan: Verb

1. To formulate a scheme or program for the accomplishment, enactment, or attainment of

2. To have as a specific aim or purpose; intend

The Retirement Plan. The Vacation Plan. The Wedding Plan. The Renovation Plan. The Weekend Plans. The Family Reunion Plan. The Business Plan

All these plans simply describe in whatever detail what is to be done over a period of time to achieve an outcome. There are only two resources in your business; your time and your capital. And only one is renewable (it’s the money). Do you have any idea how you are going to invest those two precious resources over the next 12 months?

This does not take weeks of thought. You’re not writing for some competition (unless you are). You’re simply doing what any worthwhile Financial Planner does. Look at your resources and work to determine where you can get “the biggest bang for your buck” and the greatest results from your time relatitive to achieving your desired goals. You do need to commit to the desire to maximize your options.

 

Here’s a Start: Take ONE sheet of paper. Draw two vertical lines. Now draw three horizontal lines. You know have a grid of 3 columns and 4 rows. That’s 12 months. January, February, March in the first row and so forth down the page.

In each box that is now a month, write in what you “plan” to do this month in terms of your efforts. Write in what you “plan” to spend of your capital in whatever areas. Those efforts will have outcomes you want to achieve. Write that in the appropriate month.

Trade show in March? Write it in. Needs $10,000 or you have $10,000 to invest? Write it in. You expect the show to generate $25,000 of sales (in March or in April or in each month after?). Write it in.

Get milestones into your plan; get the big account by; achieve sales volume of $xx by; introduce new products by. Get it on your calendar. Your schedule/calendar/plan is becoming real!!

If you make it more complicated you won’t do it. Make it easier and you can do it TOMORROW. New Year’s Day. Start the Year with a Plan. Even a bad plan is better than no plan.

If you fail to plan, you plan to fail” Ben Franklin

Only 40% of wholesale businesses survive to year five. Plan to be a survivor.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

Change, Disruption and 2020 in Review

  • by Tom Larsen | 06 Jan, 2021 |
  • change, choice, disruption, pandemic |

Over the the past year, I largely wrote about change and disruption. I even had a blog about change in March, Pre-Pandemic. Change and disruption are inextricably linked which generally creates resistance to change because it creates disruption. Most people do not seek disruption. It is less predictable than status quo.This past year has been … Continue reading Change, Disruption and 2020 in Review

Read

Never Waste A Good Crisis: What if……

  • by Tom Larsen | 18 Nov, 2020 |
  • change, choice, disruption, pandemic |

We talk so much about disruptive technologies and how positive they are. We rebuild after disaster disruptions, often for the better. What if we treated COVID-19 as a disruptive technology or disaster?

Read

You thought you understood disruption

  • by Tom Larsen | 28 May, 2020 |
  • change, choice, disruption, pandemic, adjust, certain, disruption |

In the past, disruption in business terms was when a new entrant to an existing market was doing some aspect radically different. Airbnb was a new kind of lodging (instead of hotels/motels). Uber was a new kind of transportation option (instead of taxis/busses). Blockbuster and Netflix in their own ways were new ways to get … Continue reading You thought you understood disruption

Read

Subscribe